Motion Induced Blindness and you
#1
(Posted this in Motorcycle Council of NSW by mistake)

Motion Induced Blindness

This is an interesting email I received saying it explains one major reason why people in cars can look right at you on a motorcycle and not see you.

I can understand this for a pilot, but I'm yet to be convinced that when a car driver is looking right at you on your bike and can't see you, it has more to do with them being a right [email protected] than it does with Motion Induced Blindness ('Men In Black' prevents using the acronym 'MIB').

Anyway...from a former Naval Aviator.

"This is a great illustration of what we were taught about scanning outside the cockpit when I went through training back in the '50s. We were told to scan the horizon for a short distance, stop momentarily, and repeat the process. I can remember being told why this was the most effective technique to locate other aircraft.

It was emphasized (repeatedly) to NOT fix your gaze for more than a couple of seconds on any single object. The instructors, some of whom were WWII veterans with years of experience, instructed us to continually "keep our eyes moving and our head on a swivel" because this was the best way to survive, not only in combat, but from peacetime hazards (like a midair collision) as well.

We basically had to take the advice on faith (until we could experience for ourselves) because the technology to demonstrate it didn't exist at that time."
Link below for a demonstration

http://www.msf-usa.org/motion.html
Carpe Diem!
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#2
Great optical illusion.
[Image: dbusasml.jpg]
I don't want a pickle . . .
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#3

Like the old saying you look but you don't see
“You live more in 5 minutes on a bike like this than some people live in a lifetime.” (Burt Munro worlds fastest Indian) imagine what he would have done with a 99 red/black hayabusaPi_tongue
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#4
my favorite , sun was in my eyes!
[Image: 11870925_10204352750091032_3366674167629...8f99a0b2f1]
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#5
Headlight modulators break the cycle. Got em on both my rides.
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#6
(21-07-2013, 07:06pm)Throwdown! Wrote: "This is a great illustration of what we were taught about scanning outside the cockpit when I went through training back in the '50s. We were told to scan the horizon for a short distance, stop momentarily, and repeat the process. I can remember being told why this was the most effective technique to locate other aircraft.

It was emphasized (repeatedly) to NOT fix your gaze for more than a couple of seconds on any single object. The instructors, some of whom were WWII veterans with years of experience, instructed us to continually "keep our eyes moving and our head on a swivel" because this was the best way to survive, not only in combat, but from peacetime hazards (like a midair collision) as well.

We basically had to take the advice on faith (until we could experience for ourselves) because the technology to demonstrate it didn't exist at that time."

This is currently taught in every air force I've had dealings with and is exactly what I was taught. A continuous sweep of the head doesn't work, it is the look/pause that allows early identification of the moving target due to relative motion.

I should also mention that a overly impacted grogan may also induce motion blindness as you squeeze and grunt!
Government certified carpet muncherDrool
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#7
Also maybe drivers are not looking up but rather at the road in front of them
Don't tempt fate,TAUNT IT!

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#8
I've posted this a couple of times in the past, but I'm sure there will be one or two that haven't seen it. There have been a few other versions, but this is the best:

http://youtu.be/sUvUo79LG_c
Government certified carpet muncherDrool
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#9
They hear me coming.hot bodies slash cut I have run on 2 bikes , traffic stops .lol
Don't tempt fate,TAUNT IT!

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#10
(21-07-2013, 07:06pm)Throwdown! Wrote: (Posted this in Motorcycle Council of NSW by mistake)

Motion Induced Blindness

This is an interesting email I received saying it explains one major reason why people in cars can look right at you on a motorcycle and not see you.

I can understand this for a pilot, but I'm yet to be convinced that when a car driver is looking right at you on your bike and can't see you, it has more to do with them being a right [email protected] than it does with Motion Induced Blindness ('Men In Black' prevents using the acronym 'MIB').

Anyway...from a former Naval Aviator.

"This is a great illustration of what we were taught about scanning outside the cockpit when I went through training back in the '50s. We were told to scan the horizon for a short distance, stop momentarily, and repeat the process. I can remember being told why this was the most effective technique to locate other aircraft.

It was emphasized (repeatedly) to NOT fix your gaze for more than a couple of seconds on any single object. The instructors, some of whom were WWII veterans with years of experience, instructed us to continually "keep our eyes moving and our head on a swivel" because this was the best way to survive, not only in combat, but from peacetime hazards (like a midair collision) as well.

We basically had to take the advice on faith (until we could experience for ourselves) because the technology to demonstrate it didn't exist at that time."
Link below for a demonstration

http://www.msf-usa.org/motion.html

Great comment, while in the car with my daughter as she was getting her hours up I would regularly ask her questions like, what color is the car rear left lane, how many cars are you away from upcoming lights, if I noticed a car on her blind spot I would ask is the right hand lane clear. I hoped this would get her to get use to continually scan and assess her environment but I never knew it was taught as a practical lesson, thanks for posting this.

On another point I noticed you used Carpe Diem! but wondered if you knew its origin so in kind to the above I hope you enjoy the following.

From the Roman poet Horace's work Odes:

Ask not ('tis forbidden knowledge), what our destined term of years,
Mine and yours; nor scan the tables of your Babylonish seers.
Better far to bear the future, my Leuconoe, like the past,
Whether Jove has many winters yet to give, or this our last;
This, that makes the Tyrrhene billows spend their strength against the shore.
Strain your wine and prove your wisdom; life is short; should hope be more?
In the moment of our talking, envious time has ebb'd away.
Seize the present; trust tomorrow e'en as little as you may.

And the Latin form

Tu ne quaesieris, scire nefas, quem mihi, quem tibi
finem di dederint, Leuconoe, nec Babylonios
temptaris numeros. ut melius, quidquid erit, pati.
seu pluris hiemes seu tribuit Iuppiter ultimam,
quae nunc oppositis debilitat pumicibus mare
Tyrrhenum. Sapias, vina liques et spatio brevi
spem longam reseces. dum loquimur, fugerit invida
aetas: carpe diem, quam minimum credula postero.

Kind Regards,

Banter
Num Custos Fratris Mei Sum Ego?
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